Help Forum

Help requested posted on 28th March 2018:

Older pedestrians

Does anyone have any older pedestrian resources that deal with using pedestrian crossings? We have a couple of issues at the moment. One involves older road users stepping out onto Zebras directly in front of cars. There have been some near misses at a particular location.

Another issue is older pedestrians being concerned when they are on a crossing and their green man disappears. We have reports that this is causing older pedestrians to not want to go out and they lack confidence in the facilities. We'd like to better communicate that traffic is held even when their green man disappears.

Just wondered whether anyone had anything similar that they'd already developed.

Rebecca James

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Response posted on 29th March 2018 by:
Roy Brocklebank

E: Roybrocklebank@talktalk.net
T:

Older pedestrians

Agree, in our last village the crossing had post office and grocers on one side with a few parking bays, inside the 25yard crossing zone where cars reverse into the traffic. On the other is a car park and shops. A heavily reinforced ATM by the crossing forms a choke point. The choke point also creates a natural meeting point where people meet and chat.

The reversing cars distract approaching drivers; the groups chatting mask pedestrians approaching on the other.

The basic issue is one of engineering no education. Railings might help as they would cause crossing users to turn on to the crossing rather than just stepping out.


Response posted on 29th March 2018 by:
Dermot McGonigle

E: dermot.mcgonigle@eastrenfrewshire.gov.uk
T:

Older pedestrians

Dept for Transport leaflet "How to use a Puffin Crossing" T/INF/249 is useful for explaining to pedestrians and drivers how puffins operate.


Response posted on 29th March 2018 by:
Jonathan Mason

E: jonathan.mason@bristol.gov.uk
T:

Older pedestrians

The DFT produced a leaflet on how to use Puffins which I cannot find. They also produced a video that is on YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8rDH7ms18U


Response posted on 29th March 2018 by:
kris beuret

E: krisbeuret@sraltd.co.uk
T:

Older pedestrians

Sorry to be negative but I'm not surprised to hear about puffin crossings. Our research for the EU SaMERU project back in 2013 reported how older people found reassurance in the signal opposite however much they were informed about the technology and even earlier the same result from the Mixed Priority Route demonstration projects. It's a case of technology winning over psychology and perception. I wonder if any authority has reinstated the old systems?


Response posted on 12th April 2018 by:
Peter Horne

E: peter.horne@northyorks.gov.uk
T:

Older pedestrians

Pelican crossings with far-side red man / green man signals are no longer prescribed in the traffic signs regulations (TSRGD 2016) and so cannot be reinstated. I feel that education methods could be improved, especially for the elderly. Road Safety officers should target this age range.


Response posted on 19th April 2018 by:
Mark Foweraker

E: m.foweraker@cardiff.gov.uk
T:

Older pedestrians - Pedestrian Crossings

Peter, Pelican crossings (with flashing amber / flashing green man) are no longer prescribed but you can have a Puffin with far side indicators (also known as PedX). The original comment was that pedestrians "being concerned when they are on a crossing and their green man disappears." This would only apply to far side indicators and was only one of the motivations for the nearside design.

The issue of pedestrians walking straight out on Zebras is not unique to the elderly and is (in my opinion) a result of training (and the Highway Code) that says (rule19) "Remember that traffic does not have to stop until someone has moved onto the crossing."

This encourages the attitude "walk onto the crossing and vehicles stop" irrespective of the previous advice to wait until they have stopped.

Personally I find that (in the absence of driver reaction) putting my hand onto the Belisha pole is a clear indication of my intent to cross (I first saw a PC do this) and works better than stepping into the carriageway (whilst avoiding being struck by door mirrors).


Response posted on 19th April 2018 by:
Andy Hill

E: hill76772@gmail.com
T:

Older pedestrians

I wonder if anyone has experience of courtesy crossings in built-up areas, where there are no road signs for the benefit of drivers and there is no central refuge for pedestrians, young or old.
There is no mention of courtesy crossings in the Highway Code, so I would be grateful for any information.


Response posted on 23rd April 2018 by:
Mark Foweraker

E: m.foweraker@cardiff.gov.uk
T:

Older pedestrians - "Courtesy" Dropped Kerb Crossings

The term "Courtesy" crossing just refers to where there are dropped kerbs and no vehicle control. The better term is Uncontrolled Crossing (zebras being Give Way and others Signal control).

Unless their is a refuge then the only feature is having dropped kerbs to enable those with wheels to easily enter and leave the carriageway. The blister tactile is only there to warn visually impaired that there is not a kerb and prevent them from inadvertently entering the carriageway.

Consequently there are (and are not intended and cannot be) any signs for drivers as most pedestrians could just as easily cross somewhere (or anywhere) else.


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