Help Forum

Help requested posted on 30th April 2018:

Y10/11 dangerous cycling

Does anyone run any interventions targeting inappropriate / dangerous cycling to secondary school age students, and if so what are they? We have an issue with students poor behaviour cycling on pavements and across a zebra crossing outside a primary and secondary school, allowing no care for the pedestrians.

G Bailey

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Response posted on 1st May 2018 by:
April French

E: april.french@bromley.gov.uk
T:

Y10/11 dangerous cycling

Hi. Unfortunately, it's a growing problem everywhere. We have started doing an assembly targeting Years 8 & 9, but could easily be used for older students.
To start, we explain why the school has called us in. We say that even if they're not doing this themselves, chances are they know someone who is. (By that point, it's clear from who all the kids start looking at -- and which ones are smirking -- who the culprits are.) We mention the fact that we realise that certain stunts require a great deal of skill and practise, but there's an appropriate time and place for them.
The presentation we've put together includes videos of kids coming off their bikes(mainly found on YouTube after much searching, since most are just glorifying swerving and other behaviours!); professional stunt cyclist Martyn Ashton (who is paralysed as the result of a cycle accident. Though he's an adult, this is shown to reinforce the fact that even professionals can't stay on their bikes 100% of the time); and a clip released by Lesley Hooper whose 14-yr-old son came off his bike onto a car bonnet whilst swerving. We also emphasise car stopping distance (i.e., if they come off their bikes -- even if they don't fall but wind up standing with their bikes -- cars won't be able to stop in time).
Possible penalties are covered (some schools are excluding students, Safer Neighbourhood teams are confiscating bikes, Criminal Behaviour Orders can be issued). Fines for Pavement Riding, Careless Cycling and Dangerous Cycling can go up to £2,500. One of our local Police Officers told us that if their behaviour resulted in serious injury to another, they could be jailed for up to two year.
Slides also show (sometimes very graphic) injuries from cycle accidents, ranging from road rash to x-rays of body parts rebuilt with pins and plates. One picture shows a boy with both arms in casts, and we ask the kids how they'd feel if they were in this situation, unable to do anything for themselves. We remind these fiercely independent teens that this would include having to ask their mums to wipe their bottoms for them.
We end the presentation talking about safer places to perform their stunts, like local cycle parks and BMX tracks. The skills could lead to a career in stunt cycling, etc, but only if they survive that long! We wrap up with a quick mention that we offer cycle training.
Hope this is helpful.


Response posted on 2nd May 2018 by:
Hilary Wicks

E: Hilary.Wicks@essexhighways.org
T: 01245 342898

Y10/11 dangerous cycling

Hi. We have run a similar event at a couple of our senior schools who was having the same problem. As we are part of the Safer Essex Roads partnership, the Essex Fire and Rescue delivered the event. We also followed this up by providing level 3 training and bike maintenance for the school students.Please let me know if you would like more details.
Hilary


Response posted on 2nd May 2018 by:
Charlie Holland

E: charlie@palaceofvariety.co.uk
T:

Y10/11 dangerous cycling

Ask the cycle training provider who to supply the trainers with secondary school savvy, or who deliver Safe Urban Driver training to lorry drivers to deliver on road sessions in these schools - the focus to be on consideration (giving time and space) to others, awareness and acceptance of othersí vulnerability, and understanding kinetic energy. There should be a light-touch approach to the kids doing tricks.

There is a fad currently for wheelies etc. Donít make the mistake of discouraging active travel by banning cycling or tricks or insisting on day glo hats - focus on what really matters, which is respect and consideration for others. Apply it to local drivers too, and zombie pedestrians on phones too.


Response posted on 3rd May 2018 by:
Karen Inman

E: karen@cycleconfident.com
T:

Y10/11 dangerous cycling

We provide a half day course to Secondary school children which is half classroom and focusses on safe considerate cycling and then half practical, taking in Level 3 Bikeability outcomes. Often these kids are excellent cyclists, they just need focussing and keeping safe. Do get in touch if you want further details.


Response posted on 3rd May 2018 by:
Philip Jones

E: phil@philjonesassociates.co.uk
T: 07958473498

Y10/11 dangerous cycling

What are your authorities doing to reduce the dangers to these cyclists posed by road traffic?


Response posted on 3rd May 2018 by:
Michael Frearson

E: michael@bikeabilitytrust.org
T:

Y10/11 dangerous cycling

The draft revised National Standard for Cycle Training is open for comment until 4 May, with a stronger focus on inclusive cycling, cooperating with other road users, and communicating the National Standard to motorists.

http://nsreview2017.com/the-draft-revised-national-standard/

Registered Bikeability providers have until 16 May to submit bids for additional DfT-funded Bikeability Level 3 training places outside London, most of which will be delivered in secondary schools.


I hope this helps.


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