Data

Title: Linking Offence Histories to Accidents Using OTS Data

Organisation: Loughborough University (Transport Safety Research Centre)
Date uploaded: 26th September 2012
Date published/launched: September 2011

This report demonstrates a model for collecting offence data for accident involved road users and presents initial police sourced data, collected in tandem to the On The Spot (OTS) accident investigation study.

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This project demonstrates a model for collecting offence data for accident involved road users and presents initial police sourced data, collected in tandem to the On The Spot (OTS) accident investigation study. These data relate to Nottinghamshire (Transport Safety Research Centre (TSRC) area) and Thames Valley (Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) area).

The following are key findings within the project data. These must be taken as local, project-specific results:

Males are more likely to have offence histories than females (this applies to both Police National Computer (PNC) and Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) recorded offences).

Offending appears to be concentrated among younger age groups, particularly for PNC records (although further research is required to understand this finding, as there are a number of possible explanations that reflect the complexity of collecting and analysing these data).

The highest proportion of identified DVLA offence histories is within the Light Goods Vehicle or LGV (van) and Heavy Goods Vehicle or HGV driver groups for both regions.

There are clear differences in the highest-offending groups within the PNC data, with cyclists and motorcyclists featuring more heavily in the TSRC than the TRL results.

Support is given to the theory that people who take risks by offending might take greater risks as drivers, as evidenced by fault within the collision causation data. There is a clear proportional increase in collision fault (road users defined as precipitating) among those with offence histories, particularly PNC offence histories.

Speed-limit offenders (with offences linked to the collision excluded) are more likely to have caused a collision attributed with the OTS causation system factor excessive speed, compared with those without identified speed limit offences.

For more information contact:
Dr Elizabeth Dodson
T: +44 (0)1509 226938

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